Notes on Kant

-Logic cannot have any empirical part, for else it could not be universal.

-Natural and moral philosophy can each have empirical parts.

-Ethics divided into practical anthropology and rational parts

-Practical anthropology should be preceded by a metaphysics of morals.

-Moral laws hold for all rational beings because they are rational.

-He’s similar to Plato, although Plato gives us a much stronger ontological description of his theory, Kant’s is quite lacking, simply referring to reason alone.

-Conformity to the moral law must be for the sake of conformity to the moral law and not anything else, for that would render the action amoral.

-Empirical moral philosophy does not deserve the name of moral philosophy

-The requirements of pure morality are so stringent that even Kant admits that it is difficult to even imagine rational beings obtaining a moral state, though we all try to achieve it.

-Character is desirable, but it is based too much on happenstance and the arbitrary factors of upbringing. For Kant, character has no bearing on morality, against whatever Aristotle may say in protest.

-Kant is a deontologist—ethics based on duty

-Nature is purposive (like Aristotle)

-Ethics are synthetic a priori